Thomas HYNES (aka HINES) Family History

William Flynn Hines circa 1914

The HYNES/HINES family summary

Many of this family of Hynes or Hines from at least the late 19th century seems to have largely settled in London (England) although most of the siblings of (the pictured above William HINES) were probably born in Eire.

William and his siblings Robert (b. 1871), Frances (aka Kathleen – b. 1872), John Henry (b. 1880) and Janetta Maria (b. 1883) were the children of Thomas Hines (b. 1837 in Deesa Barracks in India) and Frances (nee Carr) born 1844 in Dover in Kent.

A number of the Irish male Hynes/Hines seem to have become career soldiers, and in Thomas Hines case it was whilst he was serving in a British regiment the 102nd Regiment of Foot (Royal Madras Fusiliers). When he was at the Dover Barracks in the 1870’s that he met and married Frances Carr the daughter of a Dover greengrocer.

Frances (aka Kathleen – b. 1872 in Dublin) Hines married (m. 1894) James Hart (b. 1869 Folkestone in Kent) and had six children James Henry (b 1895), Thomas (b. 1897), John – aka Jack – b. 1899), Jeanetta (b. 1902), Caroline (b. 1904) and Josephine G. (b.1914). From 1894 the Hart and the families were joined and as such would play a joint role in the subsequent decades.

The history of the 102nd Regiment of Foot (Royal Madras Fusiliers) was to have a major impact on the Hines’ and Hart families from that time right through to the time that Eire became an independent country after the end of WW1.

Briefly:-

Description: Formed in 1746 as part of the East India Company. In 1830 they were renamed the HEIC Madras European Regiment. In 1839 they were renamed the HEIC 1st Madras Europeans. In 1843 they were renamed the HEIC 1st Madras European Fusiliers. In 1862 they joined the British army as the 1st Madras European Fusiliers. In the same year they were renamed the 102nd Regiment of Foot (Royal Madras Fusiliers).
The Regiment came to England for the first time in 1870, but was only to have six years in this country, being stationed at Dover, Parkhurst and Portland, before embarking for overseas in April 1876. It spent two years in Gibraltar, followed by a tour in Ceylon where it remained until returning back to England, and then Ireland in 1887. The Regiment was abroad when it was re-designated the 1st Battalion The Royal Dublin Fusiliers, its depot being at Naas. In 1881 the Royal Dublin Fusiliers were formed by amalgamating with the 103rd Regiment of Foot (Royal Bombay Fusiliers).

To Be Continued

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